Academic

11/22/2014

Acing the Essay: Expository Essays

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An expository essay asks the writer to present his or her opinions, ideas, and arguments on a particular topic. As with other types of essays, a thesis statement is presented, and the five-paragraph format is usually followed. (See our blog “Acing the Essay: Introduction,” for more information on essays.)

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10/05/2014

Acing the Essay: Introduction

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The fall semester is underway, which means an essay will inevitably be assigned in at least one of your classes. Many students confuse an essay with a research paper, but an essay is a distinctly different type of writing. The Free Dictionary defines the essay as "a short literary composition on a single subject, usually presenting the personal view of the author."

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09/03/2014

Movie Review Analysis, Part I

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This post starts a series discussing Rex Reed’s review of If I Were You (2013), a film which critics generally did not take to. Of the many negative reviews of this movie, Reed’s stands out to me as expressing the most dislike. His review is useful for analyzing some features of argument; recognizing the elements involved in creating and delivering an argument will help you argue (and therefore write) more successfully.

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10/12/2012

Choosing a Legitimate Academic Writing Service

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There are a lot of academic writing services out there. How do you decide which one to use? The suggestions below can help.

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10/05/2012

A Ridiculously Easy Way to Raise Your Grades

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You might view your college professor as little more than a droning voice coming from the general direction of the podium, and you might think your professor views you as just another face in the crowd. This may be true in huge lecture settings. But when it comes to smaller classes, you’d better believe that your professor forms some opinions about you, and it’s to your benefit to do what you can to make those opinions positive, especially in a class where there’s a higher degree of subjectivity to the grading.

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09/05/2012

Using an Academic Writing Service Responsibly

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Many students who use a writing service do so with the intent of simply putting their name on the finished product and turning it in as their own work. That’s their choice, but they do themselves a huge disservice by not taking advantage of what can be an excellent learning opportunity.

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07/03/2012

The Basics of Academic Writing, Part Four

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We’re back from an excellent vacation in the northeast. Office Cat now wants to relocate to Boston. We’re in the triple digits here at home, and his coat is luxurious but unforgiving in this heat.

Today we carry on with our academic writing series. We’ve described how to summarize and evaluate; now it’s time to explain that most dreaded of terms—analysis. Students have an automatic groan reflex triggered by this word and any of its variations, but really, it’s not that bad. Like anything else, you just have to understand and practice.

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06/01/2012

The Basics of Academic Writing, Part Three

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We know you’ve been on the absolute edge of your seat waiting for the next installment of our academic writing series. Well, here it is! We’ll discuss evaluation today, and explain its importance in critical thinking and writing.

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Posted by: ADMIN

05/23/2012

The Basics of Academic Writing, Part Two

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In our previous academic post, we offered a definition of academic writing and introduced its four basic parts: summary, evaluation, analysis, and synthesis. Today’s post should help you understand how and when to use a summary in an academic paper.

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Posted by: ADMIN

05/20/2012

The Basics of Academic Writing, Part One

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On one hand, academic writing can seem fairly straightforward, because much of it involves communicating your opinions and interpretations of an issue or text. You are used to offering opinions on a daily basis, after all. What you may not be used to, however, is framing those opinions within a critical context and supporting them with reasons and evidence. In academic writing, it is not enough to simply state your views; you must explain your reasons for believing them. This kind of critical thinking is the cornerstone of academic writing.

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Posted by: ADMIN

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